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Of Mud, Media, and the Metropolis: Aggregating Histories of Writing and Urbanization

Of Mud, Media, and the Metropolis: Aggregating Histories of Writing and Urbanization,” Cultural Politics 12:3, Special Issue on Geological Media, edited by Jussi Parikka (November 2016) [images available here]

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Presentations

Response to “The Politics of Sorting at Borders” (2016)

I had the pleasure of responding to Miriam Ticktin’s November 11 presentation, “The Politics of Sorting at Border Walls,” at the Graduate Institute for Design, Ethnography and Social Thought. I played Josh Begley’s Best of Luck With the Wall on the wall behind me while I shared the these comments.

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Presentations

Lebbeus Woods: The Politics of Small Things (2014)

At the Lebbeus Woods memorial celebration at the Cooper Union on April 26, 2014, I spoke about the “politics of small things,” modest gestures, and intimate conversations in his work. You can find my talk and slides here.

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Archiving Learning as a Messy, Partial, and Political Process (2013)

I joined Kimon Keramidas (Bard Graduate Center); Micki McGee (Sociology, Fordham University); Trevor Owens (National Digital Information Infrastructure and Preservation Program, Library of Congress); Ethan Watrall (Anthropology and MATRIX Center for Humane Arts, Letters and Social Sciences Online, Michigan State University); and Catherine Whalen (Bard Graduate Center) at the Bard Graduate Center on April 5, 2013, to talk about “Digital Pedagogy and Material Archives.” Here are the text and slides from my talk.

As the digital era influences the academic realm more and more profoundly, the possibilities and pursuant complexities of new technologies in the classroom create a compelling yet equally vexing environment. Perhaps one of the most challenging questions concerns what to do with the array of digital projects and materials being produced by students and faculty. Whereas in the past paper—both as a medium and as a format for research output—defined the processes of storage and archiving of this scholarly work, the wide variety of output formats generated by the tools and platforms of the digital age create a much more heterogeneous and difficult-to-manage collection of works. This condition is particularly true with regard to the study of material culture, as objects in the material world tend to suffer from a loss of resolution and fidelity when converted to the digital medium, exacerbating the questions of conservation and preservation that are critical to archival practice. With the aim of better preparing the Bard Graduate Center for the development of its own archive of student and faculty work, this conference aims to examine how digital pedagogues currently consider questions of preservation and archiving, and to reimagine what resources, practices, and structures would be deemed necessary to develop an ideal archive of digital pedagogical materials.